Balance Disorders


What is a balance disorder?
A balance disorder is a disturbance that causes an individual to feel unsteady, giddy, woozy, or have a sensation of movement, spinning, or floating. Balance is rooted int the labyrinth, a tiny organ in our inner ear. The labyrinth, is an important part of our vestibular (balance) system. The labyrinth interacts with other systems in the body, such as the visual (eyes) and skeletal (bones and joints) systems, to maintain the body’s position. These systems, along with the brain and the nervous system, can be the source of balance problems. Three structures of the labyrinth, the semicircular canals, let us know when we are in a rotary (circular) motion. The semicircular canals, the superior, posterior, and horizontal, are fluid-filled. Motion of the fluid tells us if we are moving. The semicircular canals and the visual and skeletal systems have specific functions that determine an individual’s orientation. The vestibule is the region of the inner ear where the semicircular canals converge, close to the cochlea (the hearing organ). The vestibular system works with the visual system to keep objects in focus when the head is moving. Joint and muscle receptors also are important in maintaining balance. The brain receives, interprets, and processes the information from these systems that control our balance. diagram of the ear

How does the balance system work?
What are the symptoms of a balance disorder?
What causes a balance disorder?
What are some types of balance disorders?
How are balance disorders diagnosed?
How are balance disorders treated?
How can I help my doctor make a diagnosis?
What research is being done for balance disorders?
Where can I get more information?